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On Kissam Avenue, floodwaters from Hurricane Sandy pushed some of the homes off their foundations. Three deaths in the neighborhood were attributed to the storm. 
Credit: Chang W. Lee/The New York Times

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Franca Costa, who lives on Kissam Avenue, runs her dogs on the beach every morning. “It’s really beautiful,” she said of the scene. She is trying to elevate her home so she can stay. 
Credit: Chang W. Lee/The New York Times

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Ms. Costa near her home on Kissam Avenue. She is the lone homeowner on the block who has not accepted a buyout offer from the state — for now.
Credit: Chang W. Lee/The New York Times

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During the storm, water filled Kissam Avenue and other low-lying streets like a raging river, ripping some homes apart.
Credit: Chang W. Lee/The New York Times

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On storm-battered Kissam Avenue, a pool filled with debris.
Credit: Chang W. Lee/The New York Times

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On storm-battered Kissam Avenue, a pool filled with debris.
Credit: Chang W. Lee/The New York Times

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Manny Martinez and his wife, Connie, in their garden. The Martinezes have lived in Oakwood Beach for almost 40 years, and spent their savings to rebuild their home after Hurricane Sandy. They both are torn over taking the state buyout. 
Credit: Ozier Muhammad/The New York Times

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St. Charles parish has lost half of its congregation since the storm. The church is planning a farewell for those who have accepted the buyout.
Credit: Chang W. Lee/The New York Times

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The home of Ms. Costa, who is set on staying. Of her neighbors, she said: “They don’t want to sell. They’re going to sell because they’re tired.”
Credit: Chang W. Lee/The New York Times